Open Forum in The Villages, Florida

An Active Approach to Aging: Fall Prevention Techniques and Balance Exercises

December 08, 2023 Mike Roth & Ed Yuiska Season 4 Episode 22
Open Forum in The Villages, Florida
An Active Approach to Aging: Fall Prevention Techniques and Balance Exercises
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Ever wondered how Pilates and movement can play a crucial role in preventing falls, especially for seniors? Prepare to have your curiosity quenched with this episode's special guest, Ed Yuiska, a retired physical therapist. Now, Ed spends his time teaching fall prevention at La Hacienda and is ready to spill the beans on his unique approach to health and wellness that actively engages the cerebellum for improved balance. 

We turn the spotlight on the importance of movement, with insights into balance-enhancing exercises and the role of the cerebellum in maintaining poise. We also delve into the world of Pilates and its value for core and trunk strengthening. Bonus: Dr. Craig Curtis, another guest, shares valuable tips on nourishing the brain by regulating sugar and cholesterol intake. And don't worry, we've got your safety in our minds as we assure you that while falls can happen during classes, they're always without injury.

Finally, we touch on practical techniques to prevent falls and how to get back up safely, mainly crafted for older individuals. We've got you covered on managing vertigo and its effects on these balance practices. We also encourage regular balance testing with three tests to give a shot. Tune in to hear from our guest, Ed Williams, as he shares his experience with a small class exercise that encourages less sitting and more movement, promoting an active lifestyle. Remember, a healthier life is just a listen away!

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Open Forum in The Villages, Florida is Produced & Directed by Mike Roth
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Emily:

Welcome to the Open Forum in the Villages, florida podcast. In this show we talk to leaders in the community, leaders of clubs and interesting folks who live here in the villages to give perspectives of what is happening here in the villages. We hope to add a new episode most Fridays at 9am. We are a listener supported podcast. You can become a supporter for as little as $3 per month or you can choose to pay more. To become a supporter, go to openforminthevillagescom and click on support in the black box. There will be shoutouts for supporters in episodes. Hope you enjoy.

Mike Roth:

This is Mike Roth on Open Forum in the Villages. I'm here today with Ed Huescott. Ed, thanks for joining me. Thank you, ed. Why don't you give our listeners a short background, or on yourself, of what you did before you came to the villagers?

Ed Yuiska:

I'm a retired physical therapist. I practiced pretty much exclusively in Detroit area. I've been pretty lucky all my life. God's been pretty good to me. They fell and I met initially one of the physical therapists and I joined him and he and I became partners and he was a trainer with Detroit Lions for several years. So we became known as taking care of sports injuries and that's kind of what I did throughout my life up there emphasis on taking care of different type of sports injuries. I moved on to the villages in 2003 and I hope to open up a practice where I was unsuccessful and I worked for the Lake Center Physical Therapy Group till 2018 and then I decided to retire.

Mike Roth:

Now it's teaching, of course, at La Hacienda for prevention, and that's an interesting topic. Why did you pick for prevention, ed?

Ed Yuiska:

Well, I got ready to retire and I talked to doctors around the villages and said you know, god's been pretty good to me. I want to give back to the community. What can I do? He says well, and I knew I was a physical therapist. And they said well, we have a pedemic here in the villages. And I said you do what he said well, falling and getting hurt. So why don't you teach a fall prevention class? So that's what I did Since 2008?. What I did is I didn't like the classes that they had around here because I wanted to do something different. It took me a little while, so I've been teaching it for three years now, the idea being that my program is a lot different than most programs, basically because I guess I'm a physical therapist and I look at things a little differently. My program is based on my premise that, in order to improve balance, you got to sit less and move more. So that's what I emphasize my program on. And then he activated the cerebellum and improved balance and with Pilates techniques, as I was a certified Pilates instructor for many, many years and used Pilates concepts in the practice. What I wanted to do was I wanted to have a program that people could work at home but they didn't have to spend 15, 20 minutes at a time, they could do it throughout the day. Because of my emphasis that last move move more, I set up the program so that these activities I wish I call better balance activities could be done in three to five minutes and you could do four to six a day and ideally, if you incorporate it after you do some daily activities like brushing your teeth or watching your coffee brew or working on a computer and taking a break, or an evening, taking a break with the advertisements. So that's what I decided, how I decided to set it up. The other thing that it was important to me is the cerebellum, which is your part of your brain, next with your vestibular system, that deals with balance and posture. So I wanted to challenge the vestibular and it's a cerebellum. So what I did is I have different levels with the activities. You don't go from one level to the next level until you're able to accomplish that level.

Mike Roth:

That makes sense, Ed. At the ahacienda, where you teach it, is it one class a week, one class a month? How does that work?

Ed Yuiska:

I teach every Monday at 10 o'clock. It's a weekly class and it's a free class. That was one of the things I wanted to do. I didn't want to charge. The other thing that I did was, uniquely, I have a health and wellness website called Pilates Plus for Boomerscom. I've had that for many years. I set that up when I was practicing because I would get patients and I'd give them exercise. They get better. And then they saw me a couple months later and say I hurt my back again, what can I do? I said we'll go on my website, because these exercises are what you were doing and if you don't improve, you're going to go to the doctor and come back. Well, most people didn't have to come back. So that was part of the emphasis too. I wanted to take my fall prevention program and put it on my website so that people could go to the website free and do it and do the activities that are on the website.

Mike Roth:

So how many classes do most people attend before they stop coming?

Ed Yuiska:

Well, I've been doing it by three years. Initially I had many more. I'm down about seven, eight or 10. The unique thing is that every week I get new people, and most of them they get it from the newspaper because they can see that law has to end my class. And then, word of mouth, I have people that tell their neighbors about it. So again, what day of the week and what time is it? It's Monday at 10 o'clock at Loha Cien Direct Center.

Mike Roth:

Every Monday, well, every Monday, well, that's four Mondays or five Mondays, it doesn't matter. I'm there, okay. So it sounds like most of your classes now are pretty small, only about seven, eight people at them. That's correct, there, they are Okay. So that gives time for a little bit of personal help. That sure does. Yeah, each class is an hour.

Ed Yuiska:

Yes, okay, and they're usually over, because some of these people keep asking me other questions. They may not be relevant to the fall, but I try to answer them or refer them to somebody that does so you said, one of the precepts of your program is to get people to stand up and not sit in the chair. That's right. Get active, get moving, that's what's important. And then I have three important parts. Posture I have is teach, because that's important and it's all Pilates posture. And it because Pilates was an exercise specialist who worked with dancers and he had the concept of plenten and strengthen. And also he's the one that developed the whole idea about core stabilization, because we know that the core muscles are initiated with all this movement. So it's important that you have good course. And then I have the activity level, and then I have the activities. And then the third area is strengthening with the bands elastic bands, and I give them a lower extremity exercises, because that's what is what is needed, and do people have to bring mats or bands to your classes? No, they usually don't. They don't come with anything. I have a handout which I give everybody Okay, and some, and if people come back then they will bring the bands. But some people, a lot of people, don't come back as a handout. I don't know if they think they know what to do or if they don't want to do the exercise. I don't know.

Mike Roth:

Okay, you mentioned the name, joe Pilates. Tell us a little bit more about him. I've heard about Pilates exercises.

Ed Yuiska:

Yeah, joe Pilates was a German. He came over here in 1926, opened up studio in New York and worked with primarily with dancers, and he had these concepts, that which we all use today. His concepts are still holding up. His idea was that you want to strengthen and use the core muscles because everything starts from the center, from your core. The core muscles really are the muscles in the front side and back, so you don't isolate, you want everything to work together as one unit. And that's basically what I, how I practiced, and then I still do that. But he died in 1964. 64.

Emily:

Yeah.

Ed Yuiska:

So if you talk to him you hear all Pilates and everything like that. Pilates is a little different from yoga. Pilates is more for core strengthening, trunk strengthening kind of thing, where Pilates or yoga is more movement, okay.

Mike Roth:

And what is the function of the cerebellum in your, in your programs? Okay.

Ed Yuiska:

The cerebellum is is basically I call it a computer in your brain. That's the part of your brain that works with your vestibular system in with improving balance. So if you have a balance shift, your, your cerebellum is always regulating this balance and it helps with posture and also helps with with movements. For example, if you started to learn when you were young, you learned to ride a bike, your mother put the wheels on and that's level one. Level two as you, your parents would hold the bike as you went, and level three they let you go. So you worked each level and that's recorded. The same thing, if you go out and play football and you learn how to play pickle ball, that's where it's recorded in your cerebellum and you go back and play pickle ball. All these activities are recorded. And the thing that I didn't feel is important, that you stimulate the cerebellum because otherwise it goes into a sleep mode and where as many programs around here have several exercise and they all do the same exercise every week, in and out. So that's where mine is pretty well different, because I have three or four different levels at each of the five exercises and you advance as after you're able to accomplish the activity five times five reps for five days, you can go up to the next level. So that's where mine is entirely different than most of the others, so you teach your program in different levels. Yes, I show these people the different levels Most of the people were. They all work at the first level. First level is always you always hold on and I always emphasize people have a chair or a counter or something. You never do it in the middle of your living room floor because we don't want people to fall.

Mike Roth:

Right, I'm laughing because we've had several people fall in rec centers when the chair that was on wheels rolled out from under them before they got their rear end down on it to stabilize it. Yeah, that's good. That could happen very easily, very easily. So in our improv classes we more or less ban chairs with wheels.

Ed Yuiska:

Yes.

Mike Roth:

Okay, joe, can you explain what your five better balance exercises are?

Ed Yuiska:

Okay, the first one, I call it just a balance exercise and you hold on to the chair and what you do is you work. We work on Pilates posture. You got to maintain your posture throughout the activity and what you do is you touch your toes forward, touch behind you, touch across your body and then out there side together. So that would be the basis on that. So the level one, you would hold. On level two, you do the same exercise, except you don't hold. On. Level three, instead of touching, you point, you do the same exercise. You point with your toes forward, back side and across. They do four exercises.

Mike Roth:

So, and then on, that level to do that. You're standing on one foot, that's right, yeah.

Ed Yuiska:

And on that level, that level three, you hold on, to hold on to the chair until you're eight, and it's for five days, because that's what we wanted, to make sure that it's established in your, in your cerebellum, in your brain. And then the next level you do the same thing, except you don't hold on. And that's when the trouble starts. Most, every, mostly everybody, everybody seems to have, everybody has problems. So if they're able to, so they work at the level that they can work at. So if they don't jump up to the top level right away, until they can accomplish the other levels and then the top level would be you would do the same exercise, except you would hold it in each position for five seconds.

Mike Roth:

Okay, so that would really increase your, your deep balance.

Ed Yuiska:

Yeah, that's, that's the one one balance. The other one is I. I have people put one foot in front of the other and talk on the telephone and what you do is you talk about five minutes on the telephone and every 25 seconds you change the foot, put it behind. I'm trying these on you, as you say. Okay, so in the in level one, you hold on.

Mike Roth:

Okay.

Ed Yuiska:

Level two you don't hold on.

Mike Roth:

Okay.

Ed Yuiska:

And then level three is what you do is you're just going to walk, holding on to the counter. You walk forward and back and then holding on to level four, you do the same, walking forward and back, except you don't. You don't hold on, and then that's just a walking in a regular step and then when it gets advanced, you hold on and then you do the heel to walking forward and back. And that's level five is when you you let go of it. You don't have to hold on and you walk forward and back. And then the other level is the top level is you do the heel, toe touching, walking forward and walking back, but you hold on. I don't have people not hold on, because nine out of 10 people would probably fall.

Mike Roth:

So I that's as you're doing these classes in the rec center steps. Anyone have fallen.

Ed Yuiska:

Yes, I've had a few people, but they were never injured. So never injured. No, okay, that's okay, and that's that's another. That's the second activity that we do.

Mike Roth:

This is Mike Roth with Dr Craig Curtis for today's Alzheimer's tip. Dr Curtis, can you tell our listeners something they can do to improve the nourishment that they give to their brains.

Dr. Craig curtis:

Absolutely, our brain only weighs about 2% of our overall body weight, yet it receives about 20% of our blood supply. So it's very important that we essentially nourish our blood vessels. As we nourish our blood vessels, will it essentially then nourish our brain. So lowering the amounts of sugars, red meat that are red meats that's high in cholesterol, can go a long way to nourishing our brain by making our blood vessels more compliant With over 20 years of experience studying brain health.

Warren:

Dr Curtis's goal is to educate the village's community on how to live a longer, healthier life. To learn more, visit his website craigcurtismdcom, or call 352-500-5252 to attend a free seminar.

Ed Yuiska:

Third activity is I have a ball. You sit, sit in your ball and throw your ball back and forth and catch it when you're sitting and in five days you're able to stand up because you developed a program and you do the same activity standing up there five times.

Mike Roth:

I guess how big is the ball that you throw?

Ed Yuiska:

Well, I'm sorry, it's a tennis ball Okay, it's just a regular tennis ball. And then the next level is you walk forward and back, so, and then the following level is you bounce the ball to the left and to the right and your side step right and left, that type of thing. So the whole idea is that people, when they walk, the idea is that people aren't used to shifting, and so what we're trying to do is get that cerebellum so that it shifts around. And then the next one we do is what we call the tightrope walking, and usually in your home, either, if you have wood, you have wood slats going forward, you walk, keep your feet on two of the wood slats, holding on, walking forward, and then the next level will be after five days, you go to level two. You don't hold on. Then you go to the next level, where you hold on and you step forward, but you turn to the left and turn to the right as you walk, and then again they do five of these back and forth, and when they were able to do that for five days without, or five times without problems, they go to the next level, and then that next level they wouldn't hold on, and then that's, and so they progress.

Mike Roth:

How long does it take someone to get to these level fives? Just several months.

Ed Yuiska:

Several. Some people don't, we'll never get there. They just don't have that ability. A cerebellum, I think the more advanced somebody is on an athletic position. If they've worked in activities with a, their body or cerebellum is used to that type of activity, their chances are that they can get to that level. And then the fun one is dancing with a pillow, and I recommend that people do this in the evening when the ads come on. You do one ad with and what it is is it's a modified waltz, is what it is, what the emphasis is having people when they walk forward and then when they turn around, they, they step and turn around. So that's when a lot of people fall is when they go to turn they fall.

Mike Roth:

Then you rotate your body at like 40 degrees, yeah, and you move your foot.

Ed Yuiska:

when you move, you're moving your foot back to a lot of people don't move. So what we're training that cerebellum to do is that when you go that way, your cerebellum is going to say move your foot back and that's and that works, because I've people have told me that they've they stumbled in every like that.

Mike Roth:

Now, since you talked about stumbling, let's talk for a little bit about what you call the art of falling.

Ed Yuiska:

Believe it or not, there is an art to falling. Problem is that in order to do that, you have to relax. That's the number one criteria. So if you're going to fall, you have to relax and just relax. But you don't practice it, you'll never learn to relax. So what I have people do is they get back up against the chair. And the whole idea is when you, when you do this, what you want to do is you want to put your head to your look down, get your chin to your head, to your chin, your chin to your chest, and look down and squat as fast as you can and then relax, because you want to land up on your butt is where you want to end up. So you're not there and you have to keep, and you keep your arms in front frost so that you don't get your arms out, because that's what happens when people fall they put their arms out. Next thing, they know they have problems. So the whole, but the bigger thing, the biggest thing, is practicing. And I don't I don't guarantee that it'll work, but I've had several people follow me. Yeah, they've taken my class and said that works. I didn't fall, I didn't stumble.

Mike Roth:

That's not the stumbling, but if someone is going to fall, that part about pulling your arms in is really important. That's right. We have a lady in our improv class who fell once and broke an arm yes, okay, I had it set. And then she went to get out of our car to get our mail shipped on the curb and broke the other arm within a week of the first arm.

Ed Yuiska:

So you see that would be hard to try to relax in that situation, but sometimes if you do stumble you can recover. I've done that several times because I do practice this in my garage, because everything my garage is like everyone else's garage is kind of tight, so it's hard to get around some things.

Mike Roth:

I thought you were going to say you painted your garage. No no, so are there any pads on the floor so people can practice?

Ed Yuiska:

No, because the goal is we don't want you to fall.

Mike Roth:

Okay, but if you are going to fall, hold your arms in front of you.

Ed Yuiska:

That's right. Hold your arms and try to relax and try to land on there. I dropped on doing a squat position and chinned to the chest because you don't want your head back Right and dropped on as fast as you can. You may be able to stop to fall.

Mike Roth:

So that's something you have to learn to do in milliseconds. That's right.

Ed Yuiska:

That's why you need to practice it, okay, and then, in conjunction of that, is getting up from a fall Okay.

Mike Roth:

So let's pretend you've just fallen, okay, and you landed in good position on your rear end, okay.

Ed Yuiska:

So hopefully somebody's there, or if they're there, they want to make sure that you're not injured. That's the number one thing you want to make sure you're not injured. If you are, you should call 911. That's what you do. Hopefully somebody is there. And then what you do is you roll on your side and roll over and get on your hands and knees and then you can crawl to a chair and then you put both hands on that chair and put one leg up, end it up and stand up. Now, if you have somebody at home, they can bring the chair to you, so you don't have to go.

Mike Roth:

Right, right. So the trick is don't stand up where you fall, but stand up next to an object or chair that you can use as a brace to pull your body up with. Yeah, so.

Ed Yuiska:

I mean, I have a video that I shows because some people fall, and it shows you how to scoot and everything on your butt and everything. If you want to scoot and find your phone, something that but I recommend you try to get to a chair is the best way, or keep your phone with you. Yes, no, we don't. I don't know anybody does that all the time.

Mike Roth:

I do Right here on my hip all the time. Even when you get out of bed at night, it's next to the bed. Oh, is it Okay? Okay, but if I get out of bed at night, you're right, I don't have a belt on, so the phone is still on the night table. That's when a lot of people do fall as you know, yeah, so how does that relate to people who case as a vertigo that?

Ed Yuiska:

makes it very difficult to do that. So they, I have them just stay at lower levels instead of trying to advance to the higher levels until they, you know, until they can do it, all right, but that's basically instead. Don't worry about going to higher levels, just stay down to lower levels. And some of these people I have and they continue to hold on. So now what I do? Before they start any of these, I tell people how do you know you have a problem? You don't, unless you test yourself. So I have them do three tests. Three tests and one is a single leg test which we do. Stand on one leg. Stand on one leg and get your posture and stand on one leg for 30 seconds. Okay, and then what you want to do is if you want you're able to do that, then you won't have to do it as often. I recommend, if you have trouble doing it, there's a standard and I have, and I have on my hand that I give out standard based off your age and how many seconds you should be able to stand. So if you're 60 years old, you should be able to stand at least 30 seconds. If you're 90, to 10 seconds, okay. So, you want to be able to stand, what the your age group is, and then basically practice that maybe three days a week. If you can't do it, I want you to do this, practice it five days a week, okay. So that's that's test one, test one. And test two is a 30 second test and that's where you put your heel, heel, toe together and hold it 30 seconds. There you go, heal the toe Right For 30 seconds, okay. And then the third test is a sit to stand test 30 second. That's where you sit down, stand up, sit down, stand up 30 seconds. How many times you can be in 30 seconds, how many times? And then there are standards based off your age group. So what you do is you find your age group and maybe when you're younger you're younger you are, the more you should be able to do. So if you're 90 years old, you should be able to do about 16 of these in 30 seconds 90.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, 16 of them in 30 seconds. Yeah, now, and what I reckon, is there a specification for the type of chair that you're getting?

Ed Yuiska:

Well, I want to make sure the chair is always against the wall and you can put some pillows down on your chair. So, if so, when you fall down, you know if you have trouble getting up you put the pillows down and then you, as you get stronger, take the pillows out because you want to get all the way down. So a lot of people can't get out of a chair. I have a woman right now it's been coming. She can't get out of a chair, so she's using about three pillows to practice this every day. So she's trying to get her legs stronger and as she gets stronger she'll take one pillow out all the way until she finally gets done.

Mike Roth:

So you're talking about a 90 degree chair. Yes, right, okay, chair that has about the least back, like I have in my kitchen. No, you don't need that. You don't want that. It's like 110 degree chair yeah.

Ed Yuiska:

Or the kitchen chair.

Mike Roth:

So the kitchen chair or the recliner, even in war shape.

Ed Yuiska:

Yeah, so, but make sure that they can't move. That's the important thing that you don't want that, because the whole goal is we don't want you to fall. So that's why I'm overly, overly cautious about people making certain that they don't fall, doing it safely. So. And then the bottom, the third part is I have them do leg some leg exercises, standing and then sitting, using bands around their ankles and around their, around their knees, and around their feet.

Mike Roth:

Tell, tell us a little bit more about that, cause I just can't see that in my mind's eye right now.

Ed Yuiska:

Okay, you take, take the band. Basically, what you do is take the heaviest band you have and put it under your table and then you can do three exercises standing tall and I this is where I emphasize Pilates posture you tighten your tummy for five seconds as you take the leg out to the side and you start out doing six or eight and add, add a couple every week until you get off to about get to a dozen so.

Mike Roth:

so it's plain to our listeners at where is the band the?

Ed Yuiska:

band's around your ankle.

Mike Roth:

It's ants around your ankle. Yeah, okay. And then so you're going to do sideways, you're going to and your hand you're holding the band on the other hand, no, what you do is you hold the, put your hand on the table. Table.

Ed Yuiska:

Yeah, keep the hand on the table and just move the leg.

Mike Roth:

I always want you to hold on. So where is the band getting resistance from?

Ed Yuiska:

Well, the band's around both legs, or around the table leg. So the resistance is it's a table leg.

Mike Roth:

Oh, okay, so it's around the table leg, then around your ankle, and so you're, you're, you're moving your leg out against the resistance of the band, right Against the table leg Right and what you do is you move it out right and think of your pelvis as a bucket.

Ed Yuiska:

You want to pull up on your, on your pelvis, on your bucket. So you breathe out for five seconds, keep it out there and then breathe in as you bring it back in. So you go sideways and then you do one across the body and then the other third one would be behind your body. So you do three of them.

Mike Roth:

Obviously you have to turn your body to get those angles Right, correct. Do you practice those in your class at the Hacienda?

Ed Yuiska:

Yes, I do.

Mike Roth:

Okay.

Ed Yuiska:

Well, I demonstrate that because we don't have a lot of tables, only one table at the Hacienda. Well, they got lots of tables Stopped to bring in more tables, that's maybe. No, I don't want to do that. So, and then the other exercise I have sitting and there there, what they do is they do put the band under under one foot and then put it over the other foot and then do a straight leg raise with the band. Again, I can't see that. You're sitting, you're sitting and you got a band under under one foot what part of the band? The other part of the band on on your other foot, and then you raise one leg up. You want to get it all the way up, straighten it. Hold it for five seconds again with you.

Mike Roth:

So you're putting your foot on the band.

Ed Yuiska:

Yeah, one's on the band and the other foot holds the band.

Mike Roth:

Sit down, so let me, let me see if I got this straight. Put my foot on one end of the band, yeah.

Ed Yuiska:

Okay, but you're sitting. I'm sitting and then the others around around the toes of the other foot, around the toes. Okay, and then what you do is you take your, put your hands under your knee, raise your leg up and then straighten your leg out. As far as it'll go, as far as it'll go, yeah.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, okay.

Ed Yuiska:

And you hold it for five seconds, tightening your abdominal. So you're working your core muscles, pilates muscle.

Mike Roth:

Okay, so this is very good, you. These are things that you don't need to join a gym to do. No, that's right.

Ed Yuiska:

And the third exercise you put the band around your ankles and you and you take, push your ankles out to the side, take them apart around each of the ankles, both ankles You're running the band around your ankles. Well, you have a small. The band is tight together. Oh, it's a small band.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, they're small bands. Okay, I'm thinking it's a four foot band. No, they're just small. It'll be a lot of slack.

Ed Yuiska:

But you're sitting and you keep your heels on the floor and you push feet out.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, okay, we got that Good. So if people are interested in taking your course at La Hacienda, do they have to make reservations?

Ed Yuiska:

No, they show up at 10 o'clock on Mondays. Have you ever?

Mike Roth:

had room over full. No, what's the most you ever had.

Ed Yuiska:

I'll be about 15.

Mike Roth:

15. Okay, so it's just. It's still a small class exercise, yeah, but it's. It sounds like it's going to be a really good exercise for people.

Ed Yuiska:

Yeah, I got most of those people. After they, the paper did an article on it. So I got most people for a couple of weeks and then it goes on. Yeah, yeah.

Mike Roth:

Off of the course. Right, but, ed, thanks for being all along with us. Anything you want to add? Last thoughts, just remember sit less, move more. Hey, I like that expression Theme saw. Thanks a lot for joining us, ed. Sure, thank you.

Emily:

Remember our next episode will be released next Friday at 9 am. Should you want to become a major supporter of the show or have questions, please contact us at mike at rothvoice. com. This is a shout out for supporters Tweet Coleman, Dan Kapellan, ed Williams, Alvin Stenzel and major supporter Dr Craig Curtis at K2 in the villages. We will be hearing more from Dr Curtis with short Alzheimer's tips each week. If you know someone who should be on the show, contact us at mike at rothvoice. com. We thank everyone for listening to the show. The content of the show is copyrighted by Rothvoice 2023, all rights reserved.

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Small Class Exercise for Staying Active