Open Forum in The Villages, Florida

The Sabatini Effect: Navigating the Course of Congressional Change

December 01, 2023 Mike Roth & Anthony Sabatini Season 4 Episode 21
Open Forum in The Villages, Florida
The Sabatini Effect: Navigating the Course of Congressional Change
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Fasten your seatbelts as we navigate the political landscape with Anthony Sabatini, an impassioned candidate embarking on the race for District 11 in the United States Congress. Brace yourself for an illuminating exchange, where Sabatini unfolds his conservative agenda, his proposals for government reform, and his strategy towards tackling systemic corruption. His service in the Florida Army National Guard, his leadership as the chairman of the Lake County Republican Party, and his experiences fuel his fervor for building a wall, deporting illegal immigrants, and slicing taxes. He is poised to shake things up in ICE and Customs and Border Patrol, with his sights set on curbing government corruption.

Our journey doesn't stop there. We delve into the heated debates of Supreme Court term limits and election security, punctuated by Sabatini's intriguing insights. Can younger judges invigorate the Supreme Court while maintaining their neutrality? Is federal involvement in election security an answer or an affront to democracy? We untangle these queries, explore the possibility of condensing voting to a single day, and expose the underbelly of election fraud. Sabatini draws a stark contrast with the incumbent, presenting his vision for government reform, funding, and energy policy.

From Sabatini's candid critique of his opponent to his unwavering support for Israel and Taiwan, we cover the gamut of age in politics and international relations. Hear Sabatini discuss the reorganization of federal departments and make sure you're ready for his radical idea of eliminating the Department of Education. As we wrap up, we take a moment to appreciate our supporters and introduce Dr. Craig Curtis, who will be sharing his valuable Alzheimer's tips each week. This conversation is a treasure trove of insights from a fervent congressional candidate. Don't miss out!
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Emily:

Welcome to the Open Forum in the Villages, florida podcast. In this show we talk to leaders in the community, leaders of clubs and interesting folks who live here in the villages to give perspectives of what is happening here in the villages. We hope to add a new episode most Fridays at 9am. We are a listener supported podcast. You can become a supporter for as little as $3 per month or you can choose to pay more. To become a supporter, go to openforminthevillagescom and click on support in the black box. There will be shoutouts for supporters in episodes.

Mike Roth:

This is Mike Roth here on Open Forum in the Villages, florida. Here today with Anthony Sabatini. Anthony is running in the Republican Primary against Daniel Webster. Thanks for joining me, Anthony. Hey, thanks for having me on. I think why don't you tell our listeners a little bit about your background?

Anthony Sabatini:

Sure, I'm an attorney from Lake County. I grew up here in Central Florida. I lived here pretty much my whole life, moved down when I was just a kid, went to public school, university of Florida for college and law, came out and practiced law in my offices in Mount Dora. I just finished up my time in the Florida legislature. I did four years in the state house where I was ranked every year the most conservative member of the public in caucus, which I'm very proud of. I'm having a strong conservative record. Before that I was a city commissioner in the town of Eustace for two years and I got a lot done there. I also serve as a captain in the Florida Army National Guard Infantry Still servings on to over eight hurricanes now throughout the years, and I also serve as the chairman of the Lake County Republican Party, so I'm the current chairman of that. I'm running for District 11 for the United States Congress and in the Republican primary. My wife, francesca, is an attorney, works at my law firm also and we have one eight month old child named Rick Hill.

Mike Roth:

What type of law do you practice?

Anthony Sabatini:

Full civil litigation. So a lot of contract law, property law, employment law and a little bit of criminal defense to keep it interesting.

Mike Roth:

You were in the Army for a number of years.

Anthony Sabatini:

Still in Florida Army National Guard going on 14 years and then, when it's been a blast, absolutely loving it, continue to serve. Probably will do it 20 years and then.

Mike Roth:

How long have you been chairman of the Lake County Republican Party?

Anthony Sabatini:

11 months. I got elected last December for a two year term so I'll continue in that role through next December and hopefully after the election. Once we win in November and swear in January, I'll pass that off to one of the other good conservatives and organization to continue leading it.

Mike Roth:

From a platform perspective. What are the main points of your candidacy?

Anthony Sabatini:

Well, I think the biggest is just doing a very strong, conservative, america first agenda. A lot of what Donald Trump talks about is exactly what I believe needs to be done. We need to build a wall. We need to deport illegal immigrants. We need to cut taxes and help business and bring back jobs. Fix this economy that Joe Biden has slowed down so much. She's created so much economic uncertainty, so that's a major, major issue for us Pro life. I want to make sure we're protecting the lives of the unborn, protecting religious liberty, freedoms of every American, including their second and Bevin rights, and really just make America great again. It's a combination of reviving the economy that Biden's tried to destroy, rebuilding our military and fighting back against the corruption in government, especially this new wokeness or leftism you're seeing in the government, and also this weaponized Department of Justice. Those are the key things. I'm running out.

Mike Roth:

So how do you fix the government with so many of these hook supporters in protected positions?

Anthony Sabatini:

Well, the biggest thing we need to be doing is cutting government. That's the quickest, easiest and smartest way to fix it is to just eliminate it. For example, the Department of Education shouldn't exist. Truth is, we should have gotten rid of it in 2017. We had the Republicans in the House, the Senate, the White House, but you had deep staters and leftists in the Republican Party, like Paul Ryan, who were fighting that. But we should be shutting down some of the government agencies straight up. Another mechanism that the Republicans thus far have failed to do but needs to get done is you need to tie the budget to policy, so we'll fund a certain agency or a job title as long as it doesn't do X, y or Z, or it does do X, y and Z, and with that stipulation, you can defund things just through writers into the budget. So, for example, right now, the Department of Justice. It's not that we don't want a Department of Justice. Obviously, you're going to want one, sure.

Warren:

We want an effective one.

Anthony Sabatini:

We all do. But you also don't want radical political actors who are misprioritizing government money and focus acting within it, and so you can block certain actions of Department of Justice executive branch employees just by spending the budget in a certain way.

Mike Roth:

Now, while I agree with the fact that we should have a southern border wall, there is something called an airplane. How do you protect us against that With a just wall, you mean?

Anthony Sabatini:

people flying into the country. That is correct. Well, that's customs. So you need to make sure that you're reforming ICE and customs, us Customs and Border Patrol to effectively stop. The truth of the matter is there's far, far, far less people coming in through flights overstaying visas than there is just straight up walking into the country or boating into the country. We've had 50 or 100 Venezuelans land in South Florida this week. So far, the response in Biden has been nothing. He doesn't really care, and so that's something that needs to get fixed rather quickly. But just putting a focus on that reforming those agencies. We talked about defunding agencies from doing certain things. I mean, one of the things that Border Patrol does now is, once they detain somebody at the border, they'll fly them in further. So, to your point, flying them is an issue, but the truth is they come in physically through the border and then they're flown in further. They're using our money to fly them in further into the country than giving them cell phones housing different types of payments. You can block that through the budget. Republicans have failed to do that. It's one of the biggest mistakes McCarthy made. It's why Ken McCarthy had to go. He should have never been the speaker, but at a minimum he should have been removed because he refused to use the budget in such a way to be constructed in stopping the invasion of the border.

Mike Roth:

Well, now we have invasion of cities like New York City with thousands and thousands of illegal aliens in up in hotels. How do we get those people out of the country you?

Anthony Sabatini:

We have to deport them. That's the truth of the matter. You have to amp up our customs and border agency and ICE to remove these people, physically remove these people. There's no other way to do it. This is what we need to be pushing. The truth is, knowing that Biden won't do it until he's gone, states need to step up in the meantime. Texas, just last week, passed a law saying that they're going to arrest and detain and push out illegals who come into the state of Texas. Florida really should do exactly the same. Every state is a border state. If somebody comes into Florida illegally, they should be removed, especially if they're a criminal illegal alien. The truth is we already have 800,000 illegal aliens in Florida right now. That's a problem. The place to start, though, is with all the seminal illegal aliens that are already in the criminal justice system. There are hundreds, if not hundreds, of thousands. That's who needs to be targeted by the state in the meantime, until we win the White House. Okay.

Mike Roth:

Another thing I wanted to talk about was term limits. What's your position on term limits?

Anthony Sabatini:

Term limits. It's probably the biggest contrast between me, my opponent in this race. I'm extremely pro term limit. I have probably the strongest position on term limits. I believe every elected official in the United States, and the president all the way down to city councils, should be term limited. And so when I was in Tallahassee in the state legislature every year I ran a bill, filed a bill, to term limit somebody with every school board members, county commissioners et cetera. My opponent, of course, is a staunch opponent of term limits. He doesn't believe term limits should exist for anyone. When he was in the state legislature many years ago he fought the term limit. I mentioned that last in 1992. He continues to fight term limits for US Congress. He probably doesn't believe the president should be term limited, proud to be supported in this race by the United States Term limits, the biggest term limit organization in the country. They're an opponent of Mr Webster who is just believe people should be career politicians. Of course he served 44 continuous years in political office and hasn't had a real private sector job in decades, so it sort of that. That's the background explanation of why he doesn't believe in term limits. And what about term limits for the Supreme Court? I do believe that Supreme Court justices should also be term limited. The founding fathers, of course, debated that. They came upon the conclusion that they wanted them insulated. I think that you can term limit and insulate them. I think they should be insulated. I think they should be independent of the power of government so they can make independent decisions and think freely.

Mike Roth:

Also, each arm limited to there's no reason that we can defend it. There's a 10 or 15 year limit. That would be reasonable 20 years. Some place in there we would be able to get younger judges on the Supreme Court. And what is your position that some people have taken about wanting to pack the court with more justices?

Anthony Sabatini:

Well, I think that's completely and totally insane. It's also wildly unpopular with the public, which is why the Democrats have backed away from it. They sort of ratchet that up every time we put something good on the court, like a Gorsuch or whoever, and then they back away. So so far there's been no serious effort towards it. Even the majority of Democrats at this point are against it. But we on the right and the Republicans know it's totally insane. We destroyed the integrity of the court system and our justice system, and so we're staunchly opposed and I am too.

Mike Roth:

Let's go over to a different topic. Talk about election fraud. You think there was election fraud in the last election 100% documented evidence very clear.

Anthony Sabatini:

You know varying states in different states, varying amounts in different states. Some states there was a little bit more some a little bit less, and most people in the election system will tell you there's always fraud. The question is, how much fraud is there's enough to turn an election? I do believe. In Georgia they stole the election. It was a 10,000 vote disparity out of millions and millions of votes. I think it's three or four million votes cast in the state. It came down to 10,000. There's already documented evidence that Fulton County and some of the urban counties they've never tracked the ballots. They have limited mail-in ballots. In fact, I went to Georgia one month after two months after the presidential contest to work with the Republican National Lawyers Association volunteering for the Senate runoffs, and I worked the phone room. All I got was phone calls from people saying, hey, I received two or three ballots in the mail, or there's ballots coming into my mailbox that are assigned to names of people who have never even lived in this home, and so they flooded mail-in ballots out to the public, knowing that it would yield X amount of votes back from certain areas that are prone to vote Democrat, and so that was one example of the sort of voter fraud you saw in 2020 election. Difficult to prove on the back end, though Very difficult unless you have a state legislature that's completely and totally committed to investigating it and holding open investigations. We saw that the only state in the country that took it seriously enough to do an audit was Arizona, and the audit failed miserably, which, to be completely honest, I don't blame them. It's very, very difficult to do an audit when there's millions and millions of votes and you have uncooperative local government officials who were essentially counter suing them in the legislature the entirety of time to inhibit the effective audit of the Maricopa County election, and so that's what happened there. But it's just very difficult. But we do know that there's, for me, significant evidence showing interference on at least two or three of the states, and there's no way we could stop that, for the next election is there. Well, unfortunately, at this point it's up to the individual states. It's impossible for us as Floridians to stop voter fraud in Philadelphia. I mean, we can volunteer in private capacities as a chairman of Republican Party and as a lawyer involved with different organizations, I can go up there and help. But in terms of passing state laws to change and secure the elections, it's really up to the Pennsylvanians, which is bad, but we're really in a bad position that way.

Mike Roth:

Election. Broad topic that really bothers me is the ballot harvesting that's happened in several states. Is there any way that there's a spotlight on that, to reduce that from happening again? Or that's the law?

Anthony Sabatini:

Sure, yeah, there's definitely the possibility of federal possible potential involvement in that area, like, for example, just yesterday. Argentina chose a right wing Republican. Yesterday it was great 45 million people voted. They got the entire thing done in one hour, one hour after the polls were closed. 45 million people and no allegations of voter fraud. They could run a much more secure election. In some countries we run an absolutely terrible system because of what you just described ballot harvesting and mail-in ballots. Those two items alone are along the length and longevity of an election, which therefore increases necessarily the potential for third-party actors to get involved in commenced fraud and to mess with the vote. So by reducing ballot harvesting and mail-in voting you're going to get more secure any election. So, federal government, I think, looking at all these countries in the world, the federal election system. They actually do hand counting too. Isn't that crazy? Wait a minute.

Mike Roth:

Hand counting and they got all the votes counted one day.

Anthony Sabatini:

Yeah, I think what they do is they limit the amount of elections that people are voting on. So, for example, we get a ballot and it's 40 different items. You get 30, 60 different things. There's as far more limited. So it could just be a presidential contest, something like that. So it's either A or B, pretty much. It makes it much easier, quicker, faster. The system is much more efficient. France is the same way. France gets their election done on a Sunday once the cycle one day, voting in all the ballots room within an hour.

Mike Roth:

So would it be a good idea to eliminate all of this early voting? Your voting places are open for two weeks for the election.

Anthony Sabatini:

It would greatly, greatly limit it. I mean, ideally, yeah, you would have one day voting. But the truth is, I think the best first step is to begin limitation. I think 10 days is way too long. Maybe a few days is okay and then see how the public reacts to that and then hopefully bring it to one day. But one day voting should be ultimately the standard. There's no reason not to.

Mike Roth:

It was the first time I voted. I mean, you voted on election day, that's it. Or you didn't vote, and maybe if you were sick, disabled and firm, you could get a mail in ballot. That had to be there at the morning elections for the election day.

Anthony Sabatini:

Yeah, we, you know, even when I was younger, we had to have an excuse. You had to have a valid reason to vote absentee or mail and then they got rid of no excuse or excuse voting and went to no excuse and basically made it anybody can vote anytime they want for weeks and weeks going into an election. I think that's bad for the system because, like I said earlier, anytime you keep the election open longer you're going to necessarily make it less secure, but it's when you allow mail in ballots for people who live a mile from the voting precinct. It becomes more prone for those ballots to be harvested. Basically, up with that way.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, it seems to me, when you allow ballot harvesting what we have now, someone could take those ballots to a location, open them up, duplicate ballots, modern copying machines and substitute for ballots for the ones that were harvested.

Anthony Sabatini:

Yeah, the two trends are obviously necessarily for related, which is that you mail out a ballot for everybody, for example, like Washington State universal ballots, millions of ballots go out, and then those lists of all the voters are given to ballot harvesters and they go to each of those houses and knock on their doors Perfectly legal, by the way, for them to knock on your door and say I know that you received a ballot this week, we're interested in chatting with you about that ballot, and blah, blah, blah. They do it in Arizona too, which is insane. The Republicans haven't closed that yet, but that's what they do, that really seems like a terrible way to run a fair election.

Mike Roth:

Now let's talk about the differences between you and your opponent, Daniel Webster. Webster's been in office, it seems, forever. Frankly, I don't know what committee he's on. I think he's done very little. And what would you do for us here in Central Florida?

Anthony Sabatini:

Sure. Well, the biggest difference based on our policies. Number one is reform of government. I believe in term limits. He's staunchly opposed to passing term limits. He believes there should be no term limits. He served 44 years in office. I have not done nearly that and I've never been a full-time politician. I've always been a turnier, worked in some capacity. I've never been a full-time government guy. He's collected $3.5 million from government over the last 44 years $3.5 million. I have not, and so I don't plan to be in Congress very long because I believe in term limits. That's what I'm going to be there fighting for. Other major policy decisions are the funding of a corrupt government. He's voted for the debt ceiling. He's voted for fightants budgets. He's voted for a lot of the worst parts of this government that's operating essentially terror in our country and against American families. I would be a member of the Freedom Caucus, which means I'd be voting for less government, less taxes, less spending on day one. He's never been a member of the Freedom Caucus. He's not a real conservative. He's considered one of the more moderate or liberal republic in the legislature and the Congress, that is, and so we would be completely opposed on that issue too. You know. The truth of the matter is the energy that a congressman would display were very different. I mean, I've always been somebody that did the maximum amount they could in the state legislature, file the most amount of bills, fought the biggest fight, especially when it came to the COVID tyranny. Webster somebody sits in the backbench, just doesn't really do much, doesn't say much, you know, and essentially doesn't really get a lot done. He's on some very insignificant committees. He's not a leader on any issue. He's in fact he's never even passed a bill, a standalone bill, in the Congress. But of course those aren't his goals. To be fair, his goal is to just collect $175,000 a year, government health care, a nice big fat pension, and just enjoy essentially his retirement within the Congress. So if you got, elected to the Congress.

Mike Roth:

That's a two-year term. How long would you plan to stay?

Anthony Sabatini:

I would probably stay somewhere between two and four terms, potentially five. I mean, I would really want to leave at the right time. Right, if we had a Republican president, some good legislation was moving, it would not be probably the time I want to jump out. You know, obviously this is a strong Republican seat, so there's no chance that a Democrat would pick up the seats. Consider one of the more Republican seats of the 2020 Republican seats in the state of Florida and in all of Congress your 28 seats total 20 Republican. This is one of the safest Republican, mostly because of how conservative like in some other counties are, and so I'd probably want to leave. Just you know, after I feel like we've done a good job for a few terms, move on, run for something else.

Mike Roth:

And let's take a quick break here and listen to a Alzheimer's tip from Dr Craig Curtis. Dr Curtis, what is the biggest limitation for Alzheimer's?

Dr. Craig Curtis:

research in America, the biggest limitation for Alzheimer's research is our shortage of patients that get involved in clinical research trials. For example, a couple of years ago a report came out that showed there were approximately 25,000 open positions for patients with Alzheimer's disease to get involved in research, yet only about 7 to 8,000 of those positions went filled for the year. So every year we run a deficit in the United States in filling these clinical trials, which in turn slows our overall ability to complete the clinical trials.

Warren:

With over 20 years of experience studying brain health, Dr Curtis's goal is to educate the village's community on how to live a longer, healthier life. To learn more, visit his website craigcurtismdcom, or call 352-500-5252 to attend a free seminar. What do you think? A younger person?

Mike Roth:

like yourself Russ.

Anthony Sabatini:

Well, what I've found is that, you know, age sometimes can be very relative. I know people in their 60s, 70s or even 80s who have far more energy than younger people. The person, the truth of the matter about Webster's yes, he is in his mid-70s, but more importantly, he's just a low-energy guy. I mean, he is just not a go-getter. I think he was probably that way even when he was in his 40s. To a certain extent he's just. He likes to just relax, hang out. He doesn't really believe that this country's in a crisis and that we're at a crossroads and that we need serious action and we need the Republican Party should fight as hard as the left wing of the Democrat Party fights. He just thinks the middle boy system of relax, you know, play defense, just enjoy life, everything will work out, we don't really need to do much in the Republican Party and everything will be just fine and dandy. I think that attitude speaks to somebody who's old and spirit, and so I think that's the biggest problem. I'm the opposite, of course. I believe that this country is in a serious crisis that even good actions from the Republican Party aren't going to be enough to save it. We really need complete and total reform of the federal government in order to allow this Republic to survive. I think that what the Democrats are doing now is quite literally striking at the foundation of all Western civilization, questioning gender and family and truth itself. Idea of sovereignty, borders, good and evil just is quite literally on the line here.

Mike Roth:

So when you talk about good and evil. Can we talk for a second about the situation in Ukraine and Israel? What are your positions there?

Anthony Sabatini:

Well, they're a little divergent for both of those countries. As much as I think that what's happening in Ukraine is absolutely evil and awful and terrible, the truth is, I don't believe that the United States can, in an effective way, play any meaningful role there in helping or protecting Ukraine. I think Ukraine's got just too many problems and the conflict is sadly not something that we're going to be able to help with. Nor should, and I think we need to really focus the pragmatic way on the conflicts that we can solve, and I just don't think Ukraine is one of them. So therefore, I don't believe in giving more money to Ukraine. Israel, on the other hand I think both parties I think most people have agreed that Israel is a very strong ally of ours that we need to fully support, and so I support the budget bill that was passed two weeks ago, the spending bill to give them additional aid, and I also stand by four billion dollars that's in our budget already to help Israel, because they are a strongest ally in a volatile region in the Middle East that is universally opposed to us other than a few countries, and so I think we should stand with Israel and continue to support Israel and Taiwan and Taiwan is a unique situation. Right now, of course, they're not really asking for anything from us, but they're an important ally and they are an ally.

Mike Roth:

Free country in the area where we need more allies.

Anthony Sabatini:

Right. No, I'm staunchly opposed to China bullying them, invading them, doing anything like that. But we need to announce that the China would make that part of our policy towards China, that we wouldn't want to have a decline rate relationship we have with them if they were going to invade Taiwan, something along those lines and project strength. But we don't know what China's going to do there. They've really not shown their hands, so yeah, something goes.

Mike Roth:

A few pandas make me happy.

Anthony Sabatini:

Yeah, the panda diplomacy days are over. I think we're not going to see much. Can't provide too much good faith in China when they only send pandas but continue to leave the invasion of Taiwan on the table as a potential policy option.

Mike Roth:

But, anthony, if someone wants to support your candidacy, how do they get a hold of your campaign office?

Anthony Sabatini:

Well, the number one thing they could always do is shoot me a text or give me a call directly on my cell phone, 352-455-2928, and also a line to my law firm. That's my direct cell phone, so they can call me at any time and, of course, if they want to check out the website, it's sabatini4congresscom. That's sabatini4congresscom spelled out. Of course, we're on every social media platform, from Truth and Facebook and Twitter and Instagram at Anthony Sabatini, to check out the website more and get involved. We're always looking to bring more volunteers in. We have dozens already out there knocking doors talking to voters in West Orange, sumter and Lake County, and we, of course, want to win more support from the voters of the area.

Mike Roth:

Have you been invited to talk to the villages? Republican club.

Anthony Sabatini:

Correct and I've spoken to them a couple times Some of the different clubs, trump clubs, of course. You know there's quite a few here, so I haven't spoken to them all yet, but that's my goal and I hope that they invite. You know, some of them are true conservatives and they've already rallied it behind my campaign and some are, you know, anti-donald Trump, and that's what I've heard in some of the clubs, and you know they don't really like Trump very much and so therefore, they don't like me very much. They're more for Webster. So we'll see who those clubs are too, and you know I'd be happy to come speak to them if they didn't.

Mike Roth:

Trump certainly has political problems with these weaponized lawsuits against them. They may not have merit. I'll go back to one thing you said. You said you wanted to eliminate potment of education. Okay, it doesn't have a great value. Are there any other federal potments that you think would have a great value or need?

Anthony Sabatini:

substantial reorganization. Actually, you know, all the agencies have lofty titles but when you look at what they actually do, they do very little. So the Department of Energy, for example, is not necessary, it's not important, it's silly, it's ridiculous. I would dissolve that one too and I would take the functions of a national energy policy and just put that in the Department of Interior or somewhere else where it's more fitting. Because the truth is like these agencies were just an excuse to create more government jobs and more concentration of power in the executive, and that's just. And the Congress, and it's just ridiculous. So that's another department that I would. I would slow stop. But the truth of the matter is, as much as you could close down these agencies, the most important, most significant reforms are within the agencies. So whether you cut the amount of cabinet beds in half and agencies in half doesn't really mean much if you continue to allow them to fester and grow at the rate that they're growing. So we got to slash and cut. You know you can cut 20, 30% of DOJ right now just because of so much of the litigation they bring against private businesses is frivolous and silly. And the you know Department of Environmental Protection? I wouldn't dissolve the entirety of it, but I would probably slash it by half and bring it to a real focus on bad actors versus small businesses who don't do anything wrong, who they just torment. You know it's absolutely out of control what they do. Anybody that's interested in the subject should read Obama's Enforcer, which is a book about Eric Holder, who's the head of the Department of Justice and what he did. You know heritage of the Bush Department of Justice and within seven or eight years he had turned an agency that was essentially non-political and focused on a real mission of stopping bad crime a significant crime into a hyperpartisan agency that looked like it was acting as if it was just the White House, the White House domestic policy agenda. It was just about moving a political viewpoint, getting political actors that are affiliated with Obama into more powerful positions. It's a fascinating book.

Mike Roth:

How do we get rid of the bad players that were put in place and protected by someone who's put into a political position that can't be fired?

Anthony Sabatini:

Yeah. So actually it's interesting Not only do we have to reform the underlying law that allows so many protections within federal government, but Congress needs to use the Holder Amendment, which means you can quite literally pass a budget that defund certain positions Like, for example, right now, alexander Mayorkas, the DHS Secretary, who will is creating an open border policy and he needs to go. You can bring his salary down to $0. So you can effectively fire anybody you want. Under the current rules of Congress, you just have too many liberal Republicans like Dan Webster that are afraid to do that and don't support those significant reforms. So by replacing those lame, do-nothing Republicans with actual conservative-acting Republicans like myself, you'll find that it'll be much easier to have a Congress. That will eliminate people in the Congress, in the government Great.

Mike Roth:

Anthony, thanks for joining us today.

Anthony Sabatini:

I appreciate it. Thanks, mike, appreciate it, it was great.

Emily:

Remember our next episode will be released next Friday at 9 am. Should you want to become a major supporter of the show or have questions, please contact us at mike at rothvoice. com. This is a shout-out for supporters Tweet Coleman, Dan Kapellan, Ed Williams, Alvin Stenzel and major supporter Dr Craig Curtis at K2 in the villages. We will be hearing more from Dr Curtis with short Alzheimer's tips each week. If you know someone who should be on the show, contact us at mike at rothvoice. com. We thank everyone for listening to the show. The content of the show is copyrighted by Rothvoice 2023, all rights reserved.

Anthony Sampatini
Supreme Court Term Limits and Election Concerns
Differences in Policies and Goals
Age, International Relations, and Government Reform
Thank You and Show Updates