Open Forum in The Villages, Florida

Navigating Retirement: Jim Bodenner on Long-term Care, Emergency Preparedness and Outsmarting Medicare Fraud

November 17, 2023 Mike Roth & Jim Bodenner Season 4 Episode 19
Open Forum in The Villages, Florida
Navigating Retirement: Jim Bodenner on Long-term Care, Emergency Preparedness and Outsmarting Medicare Fraud
Open Forum in The Villages, Florida
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Get ready for a riveting dialogue with Jim Bodenner, the insightful president of The Villages chapter of the National Retiree Legislative Network (NRLN). We'll navigate through a multitude of topics, including the hefty cost of long-term care, the significance of insurance, and an innovative concept known as "plan C" - the zero-step home! 

Additionally, we'll explore the paramount importance of emergency preparedness, from the value of a Knox box to the life-saving AED program in the Villages. We'll unveil the revolutionary Smart911 app that provides 911 operators with crucial information during emergencies. As we wrap up our conversation, we delve into the dark world of Medicare fraud and identity theft, discussing preventive measures and how to set up alerts on your credit card account. Plus, don't miss the Alzheimer's tip from Dr. Craig Curtis and learn about Jim's commendable efforts with NRLN, Rotary, and Langley Health Services to provide low-cost dental services to low-income veterans. Brace yourself, this episode is brimming with enlightening discussions and valuable insights!

Jim Bodenner is a retired attorney and Jim and his wife owned a longterm care business for 25 years.  Jim is a regular speaker for the NRLN which is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that advocates for issues that impact retirees.

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Open Forum in The Villages, Florida is Produced & Directed by Mike Roth
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Mike Roth:

This is Mike Roth on Open Forum in the Villages, Florida. I'm back with Jim Bodenner @gmail. com. we're going to be talking a little bit more with Jim about some of the additional projects he is involved with. I want to talk more about Jim, the National Retirees Legislative Network. What type of issues do you guys work?

Jim Bodenner:

o It's a national organization. It's a non-partisan, non-profit organization based in Washington DC, and I'm the president of the villages chapter of the National Retiree Legislative Network. The NRLN advocates for issues that impact retirees, meeting with members of Congress on a regular basis. My role here in the villages is not so much advocacy, although I do go to Washington DC once a year to talk to legislators. My real role here is education, to try to educate folks here in the villages on issues that are important to us. Some of them are issues that the NRLN regularly deals with. Some are issues that, just as retirees, we regularly deal with. I do it regularly. I'm a public speaker on a regular basis, trying to educate folks on complex issues.

Mike Roth:

So if someone wants to contact you after they listen to this podcast, how do they?

Jim Bodenner:

do that, jim. They can send me an email at . That's my last name b-o-d-e-n-n-e-r-j at gmail. com. I would be glad to talk to you. I'd be glad to talk to your groups. I'm going to be speaking soon at a church. I speak to Rotary Clubs. I speak to lots of different organizations on a regular basis about these very important issues.

Mike Roth:

Mm-hmm, Jim. What are some of the issues relative to long-term care?

Jim Bodenner:

Yes, long-term care. My wife and I own the long-term care business in Michigan for 20 years. My wife's a very smart lady. She was the administrator of our facility. We owned an assisted living facility and a skilled nursing home. Long-term care is very, very expensive. We all talk about medical insurance and the cost of medical insurance. That's a very, very important conversation, but I don't hear anybody talking about the cost of long-term care.

Mike Roth:

So what do you think? The cost of long-term care?

Jim Bodenner:

should be or is the cost of long-term care? The national average to stay in a skilled nursing home is about $110,000 a year. It's higher here in the central Florida area, in the villages area, assisted living is a lower level of care and assisted living can run anywhere from $6,000 to $8,000 a month. It's going to change. It's going to be different community by community.

Jim Bodenner:

I'm a huge advocate of long-term care insurance. I'm asked the question all the time Do I like long-term care insurance? My answer to that is yes, provided that you purchased it 20 to 25 years ago from one of a handful of companies that were smart enough to properly underwrite it 25 years ago and are still in business and financially strong today. Those policies provided benefits that, once they start, many of those policies go on forever. The policies that you might buy today look more like. They're all different, but they look more like a whole life insurance policy where you're buying in quotes insurance for a fixed period of time, maybe a couple years of maximum insurance.

Jim Bodenner:

I've always said the risk of long-term care isn't at your age, 85 or 90, and you need a skilled nursing home for one or two years. That's not the risk. The risk is your 60, 65, 70, and you need long-term care for 20. That's the multimillion-dollar risk that very few of us are prepared to meet. Long-term care is expensive. It's a financial planning decision. If cash works real well in your long-term care insurance planning, cash works great if you've got enough of it. But if you don't, you need a backup plan. What's plan B? I'm always I'm a plan B. What's plan B Long-term care insurance if you bought it many years ago? And what are the right companies? Well, I don't want to start pitching any company, not to pitch the company but give us a couple of examples.

Jim Bodenner:

My wife and I were fortunate enough to have some good advice 25 years ago from a trusted friend, and we purchased our policies from Northwest Mutual Insurance Company Great company. Are the policies today expensive? You bet they are, but they're also providing $10,000, $12,000 a month in long-term care benefits for myself and a similar amount for my wife. Once those benefits start, they'll go on for as long as our disability continues. Yes, it is expensive, but it also provides a safety net below our financial plan to take care of our needs If we need them. If we don't, we lose. But the backup plan, mike, the plan C, the plan C yes, I'm always. I'm a plan A, plan B, plan C guy. Plan C is the line I always use is long-term care starts at home. Think about either building or remodeling your home to make it zero step.

Jim Bodenner:

Here's what I mean by zero step. Try to. People would like to live in their home as long as they can. People would rather bring home healthcare into their homes rather than living in an assisted living facility. At least many people would prefer that. The problem that we have is we have all of these four inch steps around our house. At the front door, at the lanai entrance, we've got four inch the garage door, four inch steps. You can get rid of those steps. There's very easy engineering things that can be done to eliminate them.

Jim Bodenner:

The interior doors of people's homes are 32, 33 inches wide. They need to be a minimum of 36 inches, not a problem. A talented carpenter with a saw saw can replace that 33 inch door in a heartbeat. Drywall a little electrical work done. Most difficult room in the house is the master bedroom and the master bath. You need to make sure that you can go from the front door to the bedroom to the master bath, all with at least a 36 inch unobstructed track. But once you get in that bathroom, what do you do? We have what I love garden tubs. They'll, you know, broken hips. They're great. They're great for the orthopedic folks, but not so good for the seniors, we have to step over to get into it.

Jim Bodenner:

You gotta step over to get into it and then you've gotta step out without falling to get out. So what I recommend? If you've got a garden tub, it's what I did when my wife and I remodeled our home here in the villages. We ripped out that garden tub. We had the carpenter. Take the concrete out, the four inches of concrete down all the way down to the sand. Take that four inches. Get rid of that four inches of concrete, replace it with two inches of concrete and then turn over the last two inches to the tile guy so that every all the water drains to the drain. You now have a zero step shower. Don't you dare put a door on it. That is at less than 36,. Better to have it about 42 inch entrance my shower. I did put up a beautiful piece of glass that really isn't needed because the water goes all to the drain, but it's got a 42 inch entrance into the shower zero step.

Mike Roth:

What do you think about those tubs that have a, that look like the three feet tall and they have a doorway that seals the water so you could fill it with water? They're great.

Jim Bodenner:

They're great. They're expensive. They're great If you do prefer a bath tub rather than a walk-in shower. Yeah, they're great. They're pricey. They do take some maintenance. In our business we had several of them over the years. They work well.

Mike Roth:

Okay, are there building codes that are a problem? I understood that building codes require these steps that the builder puts in.

Jim Bodenner:

See, I had a builder one time tell me that I couldn't take, I couldn't get rid of that four inch step at the front door because of a flood risk. This was a builder that had built homes forever. I looked at him and I said what did you just say? Did I drop the elevation of the entire house down four inches? I didn't change the elevation of the house. The house is still four inches up. You just can't see the four inches because I raised the pavers at the front door. I broke the pavers back about 12 foot and reset those pavers, getting rid of that four inches. So you made a 12 foot ramp. What 12 foot ramp that you can't see? You cannot see that ramp. It disappears in the landscaping. It disappears. You don't know when you walk in my front door that you just walked in a four inch ramp. But you're exactly right, that's what I did. I created a ramp.

Mike Roth:

Okay, good. Is there anything else that the National Retirees Legislative Network does that our folks should be aware of?

Jim Bodenner:

Yes, they do. They advocate for a lot of very, very technical issues, from de-risking pension plans, pension plans that a company has and they sell them off to a third party company. There's risk attached to that. The Pension Tire Guarantee Fund won't provide reinsurance on that risk. They're very active in that area. The areas that I talk about most are Medicare, the privatization of Medicare. The concerted effort that we that's a foot to get people to give up their Medicare supplements and acquire Advantage plans is effectively privatization of Medicare. We're turning the Medicare system over to for-profit companies that run these Advantage plans.

Jim Bodenner:

One of the biggest, one big area that the NRLN is very active in is to reduce the cost of prescription drugs. It affects every single one of us and the good news is there's progress being made. Many of you have heard the press stories that, effective first of this year, insulin has been capped at $35 a month effective January 1st 2025. Total out-of-pocket costs for drugs will be capped at $2,000 a year. We've all heard about the dilemma of Medicare. Today represents 60 million people and they can't negotiate with pharma over drug prices. That seems crazy.

Mike Roth:

It seems like there must have been a payoff in there.

Jim Bodenner:

I can't comment on that. But I can comment on the fact that, effective January 1st, medicare can start negotiating drug prices with 10 drugs. It's my understanding that list of 10 will increase over the next few years, but we have 10 well-used drugs that Medicare can start negotiating for effective the 1st of January.

Mike Roth:

Let me ask you a different question about allowing fire department to have access to your home when you can't open the door. You're either away or you're falling down inside your home. We've had a couple of people that I know fall. Okay, there's a device called a lock box.

Jim Bodenner:

Great, great question. I had the pleasure to spend time with the fire department and the police talking about some of these non-traditional law enforcement issues, and I've included when I'm out talking. I talk about these issues not as an expert because I'm not, but the sheriff has told me look, you want a speaker, bring us out. We'll tag team a presentation with you. One of them is the Knox box. Let's say you just called 911 and you're unable to get out of your bed. But you call 911. The fire department, the police, come to your front door. It's locked. What are they gonna do? I can tell you what they're gonna do. They're gonna break your front door down.

Jim Bodenner:

You can buy what's called a Knox box. You've seen them on commercial buildings. They're little secure boxes that hang on the side of your house. You bolt it to the side of your house. You call the fire department. They come out and lock your house key in that Knox box. You don't have a copy of that key. The only person that has the Knox box key is the fire department. Now if you call 911, they know that you've got a Knox box, they use their master key to open the Knox box. Get your house key, open your door come into your home. They didn't break your front door down. Good program. I've got one in my house. The fire department was great. We learned about it through a presentation the fire department made to our rotary club. Is it expensive? The Knox box was about $100, as I recall. The fire department of course doesn't charge you to come out and lock your key in it, but they support it very much.

Mike Roth:

There's only one master key for all Knox boxes.

Jim Bodenner:

I'm not sure how their system works, but it is secure. I don't concern myself with it, but I do know the fire department can get in my home if they need to.

Mike Roth:

And there's no problem like the Post Office has with their master keys.

Jim Bodenner:

I have not ever heard of a problem with an Xbox.

Mike Roth:

And there's no problem in putting them on private dwellings as opposed to commercial.

Jim Bodenner:

Not at all, not at all. The fire department here in the village is strongly encourages it.

Mike Roth:

I had never heard about it, so that's something on the to-do list that everyone now got. Yes, okay, what are you feeling about the AED program? Some neighborhoods here in the villages have AED boxes, supported by the villagers in that village.

Jim Bodenner:

Yes, it's a great program. I'm a personally a trained AED responder. We have two of them in our neighborhoods. They save lives. If you can get to that person quickly, it can save their lives. The community we live in is only about two minutes from the firehouse, so it's real hard for us to get there, the trained AED folks to get there before the fire department, the police department get there. But that AED will save people's lives and they also train the first responders on CPR. Cpr can save your life. It might save your spouse's life if you know how to do it.

Mike Roth:

Let's talk a little bit more about non-traditional law enforcement. What's going on here in the villages about that?

Jim Bodenner:

Well, there are a number of topics that I include on my talking point list, but let me talk about one that is so interesting. If you dial 911, if I dial 911, the 911 operator is gonna look at the call and say, hmm, interesting, this guy's from Grand Rapids, michigan. No, he's not, he lives in the villages. But my iPhone? We all have phones, right, cell phones from somewhere else. We brought our phone numbers down here, right? Yeah, portability, and mine is from Michigan.

Jim Bodenner:

You can download the smart 911 app off the app store. You go into that app and you put your real information in who are you, what drugs are you taking, what, who's your emergency contact, what's your spouse's name and phone. Could you tell all the listeners the name of that program? Again, it's smart911.com. Or just go to the app store and download the smart 911 app. You put it on your phone. Put it on your phone, username and password, of course, fill out whatever information you wanna provide. And now, if you call 911, all of that data, through the Enhanced 911 System, will gravitate over instantly to the 911 operator.

Jim Bodenner:

So does that include every drug that you're taking? If you put them in there, it will, and I can comment here on the importance of drugs, that your emergency people know what drugs you're taking. Let me give you an example. If you have a stroke and you're unconscious and you're in an emergency room, what's the first question that the emergency room doctor is going to ask you, that you're not going to be able to answer because you're unconscious what drugs are you on? What drugs are you on? Why is that important? Because that doctor wants to know whether they can give you the clot-busting drug. I'm not a doc. I'm not a doctor, don't even pretend to be, but I do know that that is a wonderful drug. It's got to be administered very quickly. I think it's like a two-hour window that they have to administer that drug. But they cannot give you that drug if you're on a blood thinner. So if you're on a lequest or some other blood thinner, you've got to be able to tell that physician the drugs that you're on.

Mike Roth:

So you can tell them that you're on a equest. What do they do for you?

Jim Bodenner:

Well, they're not going to give you the clot-busting drug. There's other treatments that they can provide. But if you are on a blood thinner again, this is not Jim the physician, jim talking here but if you are on a blood thinner, it's my understanding that if they give you the clot-busting drug, it could kill you Again. That's that's you have to be able to, and there's some techniques. How do you keep your drugs handy? That's that becomes the biggest question. You can have a list of drugs in your wallet, but you were in bed when the ambulance showed up and your wallet's on your in your pants, on your, on the hook in your closet. That's not going to help. No, that's not going to help very much.

Jim Bodenner:

I've become the new unofficial, unpaid, unsponsored spokesperson. Post-a-boy, post-a-boy Again, don't work for him, Don't get paid. But the a dear friend of mine guy, who's really smart guy named Dave Baer, did a presentation to. He's also a geek, which you know. He probably can call himself a geek, but he did a presentation to our Rotary Club recently on how an eye watch can save your life. A what A eye watch? An Apple eye watch? How does that work? Yeah, how does that work? Well, he made this presentation to our Rotary Club and I thought well, geez, that sounds good. My wife and I went out and got eye watches. What the heck? They tell time too, don't they? That's what I figured. I'll never need it for anything other than telling time, so that won't work. If you have an Android phone.

Mike Roth:

Well the.

Jim Bodenner:

That's probably true. I don't know if there's a similar system for Android or not.

Mike Roth:

There is a, an app on my Android Samsung watch that tells you something, but go ahead, Jim.

Jim Bodenner:

So here's what happened. We got the eye watches a couple of months ago. We're in the mountains of North Carolina, in the Cherokee Indian Reservation, in the middle of nowhere, boondocking off grid in our Airstream. 11 o'clock at night, my eye watch wakes me up and tells me to seek immediate medical care. Oh, what do you do now? You're in the middle of nowhere, you're not sure what's going on, although your heart's, you know, racing at about 150 pulse, went to the emergency room. Yep, I was an AFib. For the first time, my eye watch told me I was an AFib. I got the medical care I needed.

Jim Bodenner:

It's an amazing device. It's got a fall feature built into it. A fall feature Correct. Summer went to spring. Fall Summer went to spring.

Jim Bodenner:

Recently, the cleaning ladies in our house. I hear a yell we're leaving, so I go run into the kitchen to say goodbye to her. Just as I hit the wet kitchen floor and did a face plant on the floor making sure I'm okay, I was. My eye watch is automatically calling 911. That's pretty cool. The other really really good thing about any kind of watch is or particularly the eye watch your medications. You put all your medications into your iPhone. It sinks instantly to your eye watch. Now you and you make sure you sleep with your eye watch because if you're, if you have to be taken anywhere in an ambulance, you want that on your wrist.

Jim Bodenner:

Also, a trick that I learned is because I'm an AFib, now I may be an eliquist the rest of my life, which is a blood thinner. You got to be able to tell the doctor you're on that blood thinner. Well, how do you do it? Number one it's on my eye watch. Number two for $14, you can off of Amazon or lots of places, but Amazon is my go to place. Go in, fill out your name, your wife's name. Indicate that you're on eliquist on this little tag. Put that a note that prescription drugs are on your eye watch. Put that on your eye watch. If you show up at the emergency room it's going to tell the doc that you're on eliquist. Remember, it's important if you're not on eliquist or you're not on a blood thinner, you want the same tag on your watch Because if you're unconscious, you're in the emergency room, you want to be able to tell that doc that you're not on a blood thinner so they can treat you with that drug, that if they need to treat you with it. So $14 Amazon, pretty cheap.

Mike Roth:

That's a good idea. Pretty cheap thing to do. I just checked my Android watch from Samsung it's what they call a watch for and it does have a test for are you an aphorite? But to do the test you have to put your finger on one of the buttons for 30 seconds. That might not be good enough if you're at sleep.

Jim Bodenner:

Well, I can. I'm not a geek here. I get out of my league real quick. You can do the same on an iwatch. You can manually test, but all I can tell you is at 11 o'clock at night, my wrist is going crazy and vibrating and my watch is talking to me and you wake up and you're scared because you've never been in afib. You don't even know what it is right.

Mike Roth:

Okay, so here you are. You're in the middle of North Dakota someplace. You don't know where the medical clinics are. You don't know where the urgent care is. What did you do?

Jim Bodenner:

We knew we were in Cherokee, north Carolina, on the on the Cherokee Indian Reservation. We were able to go to the, the Cherokee emergency room on the reservation, got wonderful care. I'm blessed to have a cardiologist down here in the villages who took two or three calls from that cardiologist at the emergency room during the day. My cardiologist down here gave him his advice on how to treat me. I'm thankful for the fact that I've got a medical team here that I've put together and I'm thankful when I travel that I can go to any emergency room that I need to and not worry about what the cost of that emergency room is going to be.

Mike Roth:

That's right. That's because you have a Medicare Part G or F. I've got a Medicare G plan, but the G or the F are the two that I strongly recommend and if you want a full explanation of what those plans are, listen to the prior episode that we do, Jim. Let's talk about a couple of the non-traditional law enforcement programs that are available here in central Florida. Tell us about the Sumter County Sheriff's Dream program.

Jim Bodenner:

There are several programs the Dream program, the SENT program. The Dream program involves folks that wander.

Jim Bodenner:

There's a I don't know the technology, but in my mind it's something similar to an Apple AirTag, but the loved one can be given a device as I understand it's free of charge by the Sumter County Sheriff that will help track that person if they're a wanderer. There's another really cool program that I didn't know anything about until I interviewed the police. It's called the SENT program. If you have a loved one that might wander, the police department, the fire department, will come in. They will rub the loved one with a cloth and put that cloth into a sealed container. If the sheriff ever had to bring up search dogs, there's a SENT in that container. Pretty cool idea. I had not heard about it until the police and fire department shared it with me.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, we have these vials in the refrigerator for the sheriff.

Jim Bodenner:

Yes, and what I recommend is I keep a 10 page or so word doc. That always attracts my medical history and my drugs. I put one of those plastic sleeves on my refrigerator with a clip and it says Jim and Sue Bodenner emergency medical information. So that whole the fire department or the police department could grab that whole file right out of that sleeve and have both my health care and Sue's health care, my wife's health care, at their fingertips.

Mike Roth:

Hopefully for the last topic that we have here in the show. Let's talk about understanding Medicare fraud and identity theft. How does that work? How do you protect yourself against it?

Jim Bodenner:

Oh, it's a complex issue. It truly is Number one. If you download my plan for life checklist the first thing I recommend there are three credit bureaus. You can permanently place a credit freeze on each of those three credit bureaus and the forms are in my plan for life checklist. Fill in the blank forms. You send those forms to the credit bureaus. They'll send you back a random ID number. Now that the only way you will unlock that credit report is if you can provide that random ID number. It's real easy. If you go to Verizon and you're getting a new cell phone, they want to do a credit check on you. No big deal. You ask them what credit. They say trans union. You go in, you unlock trans union for two days. They run their credit check. It drops back down. Nobody gets into that credit file, including the bad guy and including yourself, unless you can produce that random ID number. It's a great first step, is that?

Mike Roth:

better than having something like LifeLock.

Jim Bodenner:

Well, lifelock. If you want to spend a couple hundred dollars a year, whatever it is I'm not sure what the cost is to trip the bad guy as they're running out of the bank LifeLock will do it. If you want to lock the front door of the bank, put a credit freeze on your file. There's other really interesting things credit cards. We all have credit cards, right. How many times a year do each of us get our credit cards had? Periodically it's white. Somebody steals it. Yeah, steals it. It's like charge stuff. That isn't you, it happens, it's happened to me. You can go to the alert section on your credit card website and set up an alert and have a text message sent to you, not for every transaction over $10, every transaction over 0 cents. You don't want to do $10 because the bad guy will go in and test your account for $8.43. And now you're going to get a real-time text message every time that card is swiped. My wife loves it because I can follow her around town.

Mike Roth:

That's interesting. I'm going to say $1,000, not a penny. Not a penny, zero, zero. Anytime anyone swipes your card, you get a text that is fantastic.

Jim Bodenner:

It's free, easy to do. The other thing that people should know is property theft. I really like your house. I think I'm going to quit claim your house to an offshore LLC that I just set up. How do you stop that from happening? Well, if you go to the Sumter County website, there's an FBI notice on that website that talks about the fastest growing identity theft or theft in the country. It's this mortgage theft.

Jim Bodenner:

Sumter County and I think Lake County has it too. You can go and a couple clicks of a button and you can tell Sumter County what name, who you are, what your phone number, what your email address. Now, if any illegal document hits the public record with that name on it, you're going to get a phone call or an email from Sumter County telling you that somebody just recorded a quit claim deed on your property. Does it prevent it from happening? No, I've thought about it today rather than five years from now. Yes, sumter County strongly recommends it. Like I said, I think Lake County does too, but it's real easy. Took me five minutes to register on it. But identity theft is a big deal. We all see it every day in our lives.

Mike Roth:

Good, Jim, let's take a couple of seconds here and listen to an Alzheimer's tip from Dr Craig Curtis. This is Mike Rothen, dr Craig Curtis. We're talking about Alzheimer's disease. Dr Curtis, when an individual decides to participate in an Alzheimer's study, are there any inpatient days required?

Jim Bodenner:

Not in any of the studies or research that I do, but there are research trials out there where patients can spend time in an inpatient setting while taking part in research.

Creig Curtis:

But here in the villages, I am not aware of any. With over 20 years of experience studying brain health, Dr Curtis's goal is to educate the village's community on how to live a longer, healthier life. To learn more, visit his website craigcurtismd. com or call 352-500-5252 to attend a free seminar. I'm back with Jim Bo. denner and Jim, you wanted to say something.

Jim Bodenner:

Yeah, if I could, mike. There's one thing that I'm very, very passionate about. One of the things is my efforts to work with the National Retiree Legislative Network, but I'm also very active with Rotary. I'm also very I'm on the volunteer member the Board of Directors of Langley Health Services. Langley provides medical, dental and behavioral health care to low-income folks here in Central Florida.

Jim Bodenner:

But we created a really unique program in partnership with a group called Sunshine State Veterans Fund and a couple of Rotary Clubs. We created this designated fund and we funded this account to provide dental services to low-income veterans. Here is the reality United States military veterans that are in financial need don't have access to dental services unless they're 100% disabled or prisoners of war. Langley is a federally qualified health care organization and they can provide dental services to anyone who's low income on a sliding scale so that veteran can be provided general dentistry at a cost of about $50 for general dentistry.

Jim Bodenner:

We created this fund through Rotary and Sunshine State Veterans Fund and a few other nonprofits. We reduced that cost from $50 down to $5 and the fund pays $800 toward the set of dentures. We have served 500 veterans here in Central Florida since the inception of the program and done about 20, 25 sets of dentures. It's an exciting project. We're very proud of it. Langley is the health care provider. They have medical locations in multiple cities here in Central Florida. We're very proud of what we're doing Good, Jim.

Mike Roth:

If someone wants to contribute to Langley, how do they do that?

Jim Bodenner:

They can send me an email at BoDenerJ t gmail. com Spelling your last name. For all the listeners it's Bodennor B-O-D-E-N-N-E-R-J at gmail. com. If you'd like to support the Veterans Program and you do write a check, I can give you an address when you call. You want to note it that it's a donation to the Smiles for Veterans Dental Program. We're doing good work and we want to continue to do so. Great Jim, thanks very much for joining us today. Thank you.

Emily:

Remember our next episode will be released next Friday at 9 am. Should you want to become a major supporter of the show or have questions, please contact us at mike at rothvoice. com. This is a shout out for supporters Tweet Coleman, Dan Kapellan, ed Williams, Alvin Stenzel and major supporter Dr Craig Curtis at K2 in The Villages. We will be hearing more from Dr Curtis with short Alzheimer's tips each week. If you know someone who should be on the show, contact us at mike at rothvoice. com. We thank everyone for listening to the show. The content of the show is copyrighted by Roth Voice 2023, all rights reserved.

Retirement Issues and Long-Term Care Insurance
Fire Department Access and Smart 911
Understanding Medicare Fraud and Identity Theft