Open Forum in The Villages, Florida

Living and Laughing in Florida's Villages with Margaret Barton

September 15, 2023 Mike Roth & Guests Season 4 Episode 11
Open Forum in The Villages, Florida
Living and Laughing in Florida's Villages with Margaret Barton
Open Forum in The Villages, Florida
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Meet Margaret Barton, a spirited resident of The Villages, Florida, whose zest for life is infectious! In our chat with her, we unravel a tapestry of her vibrant experiences, from her involvement in numerous clubs to how she benefits from a free gym membership through Medicare. You'll appreciate her tales from the Improv club, painting a vivid picture of her six-month journey before the COVID-19 pandemic hit. The cherry on top? A light-hearted joke from yours truly, Mike Roth, dedicated to my grandson, Evan, that will bring a smile to your face!

As we delve further into the conversation, Margaret shines a light on her love for improv comedy, adding an unexpected twist to mundane scenarios like divorce law. We explore her musical side as well, with a sneak peek into the upcoming music-filled show in November. Her experiences at the Sarasota Improv Festival are sure to tickle your funny bone. To everyone who's supported us - we couldn't do this without you! We wind down with a reminder about copyright protections - our content is by Rothvoice 2023, all rights reserved. So, if you're craving laughter, learning, and a dash of community spirit, this episode is the perfect companion!

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Open Forum in The Villages, Florida is Produced & Directed by Mike Roth
A new episode will be released most Fridays at 9 AM
Direct all questions and comments to mike@rothvoice.com

If you know a Villager who should appear on the show, please contact us at: mike@rothvoice.com

Emily:

Welcome to the Open Forum in the Villages, Florida podcast. In this show we talk to leaders in the community, leaders of clubs and interesting folks who live here in the villages to give perspectives of what is happening here in the villages. We hope to add a new episode most Fridays at 9 am. We are a listener supported podcast. You can become a supporter for as little as $3 per month or you can choose to pay more. To become a supporter, go to openforminthevillages. com and click on support in the black box. There will be shout outs for supporters in episodes. In season 4, we have made some dramatic improvements and changes. First is a clarification of the podcast's title. It is open forum in The Villages, Florida, to make clear that this is a regional show, independently produced for folks who live in central Florida and the villages areas, and is a dramatic increase in the use of AI in the creation of each episode. In fact, the show's announcers are now all AI voices, including me, Emily. Hope you enjoy.

Mike Roth:

This is Mike Roth. I'm here today with Margaret Barton, who has been a part of our improvisational theater club, I think almost since the beginning. Thanks for joining us today, Margaret.

Margaret Barton:

Thank you, thanks for having me.

Mike Roth:

Margaret, why don't you tell our listeners a little bit about your experience, about how long you've been here in the villages and the kind of clubs that you belong to?

Margaret Barton:

Okay, I've been here about my house in early 2014 and I moved here right around Thanksgiving of that year, so about nine years and I moved here from the Detroit Michigan area. I love it here. I've been in several clubs, including your Improv group, which is wonderful, and I also am in a lot of exercise groups. I bike, I go to the gym, I have gym trainer at the gym I have. Most of my other endeavors relate to what I could do to exercise.

Mike Roth:

Good, good. So did you buy one of those electric bikes or are you using a regular, like 10 speed bike?

Margaret Barton:

Well, I have a mountain bike, a regular bike, but I mostly bike, at least this time of the year. In my house I have a life cycle which has a recumbent seat on it, and that's what I ride.

Mike Roth:

Oh okay, Certainly better than being out in the 100 degree weather trying to bike.

Margaret Barton:

It's not only better, it's safer.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, are you a member of any biking clubs?

Margaret Barton:

Not here. I was in Michigan. I did 20 years of the Michigander, which is a 300 or 350 mile bike ride every summer all over the state of Michigan, sometimes in the West Coast, east Coast, northern part, all over. So once I moved here I have not joined one of those type of bike clubs yet, but I like to and I have done several bike trips in Europe and one in California, and you said you were a member of a health club here in the villages.

Margaret Barton:

Which one I might go to Genesis, formerly MVP. I've been going there since I moved here. They have classes, they have equipment, they have trainers. It's close and it's free.

Mike Roth:

Tell us how this is about free. They might be interested in that.

Margaret Barton:

Free is for the club. If you have a trainer, you have to pay for that, but everything else is free. I mean it's part of your Medicare plan.

Mike Roth:

Really, that's right. You did not know that? Yes, yes, I used to be a member up until COVID, when I stopped going and then I decided never to go back.

Margaret Barton:

Well, it's great because it is. It's completely covered. There's no fee. I don't know what the monthly fee would be, but you don't pay anything. It's part of your silver sneakers or whatever program. They're available to anybody that's on Medicare.

Mike Roth:

Is that only on an Advantage Medicare plan? No, any Medicare plan.

Margaret Barton:

Well, any Medicare plan that has. Well, I used to have Blue Cross before I had Medicare Advantage and it was covered on that too. So, yes, as far as I know it covers everybody. You could look into that.

Mike Roth:

I could. I think several of our listeners would.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, it's wonderful.

Mike Roth:

I kind of remember paying about $80 bucks a month.

Margaret Barton:

I did too. When I first moved here I didn't realize that it would be free. Then somebody I know that was going there and said, hey, it's covered. And I went up to the desk and sure enough it was, and I haven't paid since.

Mike Roth:

Okay, which one of the trainers are you using it? His?

Margaret Barton:

name is Robert Gonzalez, so he is fabulous. He's in great shape and he works hard and he is fabulous to work with.

Mike Roth:

Great, great. So what are the clubs that you're active in, or what?

Margaret Barton:

Well, I mean single in the villages. I mean single baby boomers, south single baby boomers, girlfriends in the villages, southern girlfriends in The Villages, Fennies singles club, they're probably more, but those are off top of my head, that's not bad.

Mike Roth:

That's not bad. The first year I was here I joined about 20 clubs.

Margaret Barton:

Yes. Which was a mistake it can be. If you have too many activities in a month, it's hard to keep track. And then also. Sometimes you end up signing up for something and later something else comes along, so it can be too much.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, yeah. Before we get into what your experience has been as an improver, let me tell a little joke for my grandson, Evan. What kind of nut doesn't like money? I don't know. I mean can't hearable.

Margaret Barton:

Cashew, that's great Good one.

Mike Roth:

It's better than a Venmo, because that's not enough. Okay, so here in The Villages, you've been a member of the improv club since.

Margaret Barton:

Before COVID Before COVID Before COVID I came First thing I remember, I mean I came to some of the classes, but the first thing I remember that was a show was the Mercedes-Benz Club and I think that, if I remember right, was about six months before COVID hit, Maybe eight months.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, and that actually was the first show that.

Margaret Barton:

Oh, it was Okay.

Mike Roth:

That I put on after I took over the improvisational theater club Right. We changed that club from a training-only club to a performance club. I've done a lot. We have a show coming up on November 7th at the Ezell Rec Center, especially valuable for those people that's south of 44.

Margaret Barton:

Which is getting to be a lot more people than it used to be.

Mike Roth:

Oh yeah yeah, they had another 3,000 acres in Leesburg in the last week to the villages. Oh, my oh yeah, so over the next five years I think the villages will get closer to 200,000 people.

Margaret Barton:

And closer to Orlando. My brother-in-law just moved here and they moved into Lake Denham, which is right down by 470.

Mike Roth:

So yeah, it's definitely expanding. Yeah, yeah, on to improv. Yes, in the improv shows, what is your favorite part?

Margaret Barton:

There are some games that I think are particularly fun. But the biggest overall thing I would say is the camaraderie working with others in the group and now that you have, after first or second show, you decided to put us all on the stage in a semi-circle. It's so much more fun because before that we would be either behind the curtain or in the back room and now we can sit there and laugh along with the audience.

Emily:

And it's really fun, yeah, I like that.

Margaret Barton:

That's my biggest favorite thing. The next favorite thing would be some of the skits or acts that we've done, which would be. I like doing the one with John when he does the birdcage.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, it's called the birdcage where you would.

Margaret Barton:

Try to buy a birdcage.

Mike Roth:

Try to buy a birdcage for your fool.

Margaret Barton:

Sometimes soon, and he has me out three years, yes, and I like doing the visual interpreter of two expert or an expert being interviewed and I am like the visual interpreter for the hearing impaired. That is really fun. I like doing fixed lines, which is two players and they only can say two lines and they aren't given the lines until the skit is called. Then they can only say those while the other person tries to construct a story with these goofy lines, and it is always fun.

Margaret Barton:

It's always a riot it is, and sound effects is fun too. That's where two people are doing a skit and they have to have someone act out the sounds that they're going to be making or that they're describing, and that is always fun.

Mike Roth:

Yeah yeah, that's always a fun skit when we either take it to a farm and the players from the audience audience participants have to do a sound of a cow or a pig or a horse.

Margaret Barton:

And it's always fun because some of the time the other person sound effects person will answer for the wrong person, or they make the wrong sound or they don't know what. Anyway, the worst they are, the better it gets. It's just a lot of fun.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, but the funnier it gets yeah, it's funnier it gets. You know, we work with a set of simple rules, usually three or four rules. First rule is always say the first thing that comes into your mind. Do you remember?

Margaret Barton:

the second rule yes, I do Make your partner look good. Make your scene partner look good and always say yes and or at least accept all offers. Accept all offers. Yes.

Mike Roth:

And the fourth rule in improv there are no mistakes.

Margaret Barton:

Oh, yeah, exactly.

Mike Roth:

There are no mistakes, it's only an opportunity.

Margaret Barton:

It's an opportunity, it's a gift, it's a gift.

Mike Roth:

It is a gift, always accept the gifts.

Margaret Barton:

Yes.

Mike Roth:

And that's one of the things that makes it so much fun.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, so I think improv reminds me of playing as a child and you get to make things up and you have your friends.

Mike Roth:

You just laugh, it's just really fun Right, and a big part of it is getting to trust the other performers on stage.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, yes.

Mike Roth:

And we play games. Yes, some people say they're even kids' games.

Margaret Barton:

Some of them are, and they're great.

Mike Roth:

That's right. About two weeks ago we played a game where we made a big ball out of newspaper. We had to keep it in the air only by pushing it up and looking at someone across the circle.

Margaret Barton:

Wow, that's a great game, because then you also have to keep eye contact, which is really important in improv too, as you know, because you taught that to me. You have to keep eye contact with the other players as much as you can, so you can. Know when to talk and when to talk and when not to Well not to.

Mike Roth:

And sometimes silence is good. Worth a thousand laughs.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, yes, for sure.

Mike Roth:

And at this point, Margaret, we're going to listen to a short Alzheimer's tip from Dr Craig Curtis. Dr Curtis, what is the biggest limitation for Alzheimer's research in?

Dr. Carig Curtis:

America, the biggest limitation for Alzheimer's research is our shortage of patients that get involved in clinical research trials. For example, a couple of years ago a report came out that showed there were approximately 25,000 open positions for patients with Alzheimer's disease to get involved in research, yet only about 7 to 8,000 of those positions went filled for the year. So every year we run a deficit in the United States in filling these clinical trials, which in turn slows our overall ability to complete the clinical trials.

Warren:

With over 20 years of experience studying brain health, Dr. Curtis's goal is to educate the village's community on how to live a longer, healthier life. To learn more, visit his website, craigcurtismd. com, or call 352-500-5252 to attend a free seminar.

Mike Roth:

So, Margaret, let's talk about some of the new scenes that we're going to be putting on in the show on November 7th, because we've certainly done a lot of scenes. We'll have the scenes from a hat and questions, where you have to wear a hat and only ask questions about the character represented by the hat or the character represented by your other player's hat, which are fun games.

Margaret Barton:

It is, they're both fun.

Mike Roth:

And usually they're extremely funny because players make mistakes.

Margaret Barton:

The better. The game. Yes and the funnier the game.

Mike Roth:

We have run some new scenes last week where one player was an IRS agent and the other player was coming in for his very first audit.

Margaret Barton:

Oh boy.

Mike Roth:

And the auditor says you know, we have two words here at the IRS that we love.

Margaret Barton:

What are they?

Mike Roth:

Taxes and penalties.

Margaret Barton:

Oh, all good words.

Mike Roth:

All good words and it has a very funny stream. Most of the improv that we do is short form. Yes, two to four minutes per scene. The show in November is going to have a couple of scripted comedy scenes where the actors will memorize their lines, and we'll also have a couple of semi-scripted scenes where the actors know what's supposed to happen but they can say anything they want, and those will probably be extremely funny too.

Margaret Barton:

Those could be very funny too.

Mike Roth:

One of them will be a knockoff of the Stanley Kubrick film 2001, A Space Odyssey. We abbreviate all that to GPS, GPS. I like it. It's a great scene. We've had it in front of the audience and the last time we had it in front of an audience, people were falling out of their chairs laughing.

Margaret Barton:

That's great yeah.

Mike Roth:

Now the show would be done in 90 minutes and there won't be an end of mission, but we do have round tables and we tell people to bring snacks and their favorite adult beverages.

Margaret Barton:

That makes us all a lot funnier.

Mike Roth:

Oh, it really does help. It really does help, and we take input from the audience. Now, Margaret, why don't you share with the audience your line of work before you became a villager?

Margaret Barton:

All right, I was a lawyer, still am a lawyer, but not licensed in Florida, and I did divorces in custody and all those conflictual types of work and I have to say that if it wasn't for having a sense of humor, I don't think I would have survived. It really was a benefit to be able to laugh at things.

Mike Roth:

Before you got to Florida, you weren't involved with improv or acting at all.

Margaret Barton:

Before. Yes, I did take a few acting classes in Michigan years ago and I did do classes with Second City. They had a Second City in Detroit it's not there any longer and they were closed I think on Sunday or Monday one of those days, and that's the night they offered class. So, I went to those for about four separate semesters of it and then we got to do recital at the end of the fourth semester.

Margaret Barton:

I got to invite all our family and friends, which filled up the whole venue, and then they sold drinks. And then I got there and I thought why did I invite all my family and friends? Because now I'm a nervous wreck, but it really was fun. It was a really fun time, Good, and we had as one of our teachers Keegan-Michael Key, who's now out in California in Mickey movies and comedy and he's an amazing guy and he was one of our teachers.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, so your line of work before coming to the villages was divorce lawyer yes in a short word, so we made that the subject of a new skit that you haven't seen yet.

Margaret Barton:

Oh my.

Mike Roth:

Oh, yes, yes, we asked the audience members to fill out a card only seven of them with reasons. A reason, just a simple reason, why people get the boss but they can't use the two most common, which are a bad sex life or money. Right, okay, the cards are collected and given to two actors on stage.

Margaret Barton:

Oh, I need to be in this skit.

Mike Roth:

And then a member of the audience tells the two actors what the skit, where the skit is and what the roles of the two players are, and they have to incorporate what comes to them on the cards. Perfect, oh, we did that last Monday night.

Margaret Barton:

It was hilarious, yeah, there are some pretty I don't want to say funny because that sounds mean, but some very funny, peculiar, peculiar things that happen at divorces that you have no idea could even possibly come up or that that would be something somebody would be telling you. It's just shocking. I maybe I got over shocked, but still surprising right at that.

Mike Roth:

Just very odd things. So it would elevate you to the area of psychiatrist or therapist.

Margaret Barton:

Oh, yes, oh, yes, oh yes, and then ask you if they had to pay for that advice, because, after all, you're a lawyer and they were asking you questions about something that isn't law related, so why would they have to pay for that?

Mike Roth:

Oh, the clock is running, still your time, but you know it's like being in a taxi cab stuck in a New York traffic jam Exactly exactly. At least in a New York traffic jam, the clock on the taxi cab runs slower than if you're traveling a distance.

Margaret Barton:

It still ticks, but yeah, I had people that thought that was unnecessary to pay for.

Mike Roth:

And perspective is one of the things that we take advantage of and improv. This show coming up in November is the first time that we decided to put music in a featured role in the show. In the past we've always had one song parody. This time, I think we're going to have two song parodies in addition to a little bit of stand up. But I guess it was back in July, Margaret, that I told you about something I got an email on about the Sarasota Improv Festival.

Margaret Barton:

Oh yes, and I'm so glad you told me about that.

Mike Roth:

I didn't know what the heck it was. I said, Margaret, why don't you investigate it?

Warren:

Sure.

Mike Roth:

And then come back with a glowing report and you said you were going.

Margaret Barton:

Yep.

Mike Roth:

And there were three or four other people from my improv going, and so I said to myself, okay, I'm going to go. And I remember buying my tickets, sitting in my daughter's basement in Smithtown, New York, and then making the plunge on the hotel, which was Expensive. Oh, the tickets were like $79 for three days. Okay, and if you wanted you could have some improv classes. So I looked at the shows and they went all the way to 11 o'clock at night.

Margaret Barton:

I know, and they started at 4 or 5 in the afternoon.

Mike Roth:

Right and I said well, I'm not getting up early on a Saturday morning for an improv class. So I took two classes on Saturday afternoon and one of the instructors was a very nice lady and we go in, for I don't think it was a five or the six o'clock show Larry Rodkin, our co-director, was sitting in the front row and he had a seat on the center aisle. He said Mike, this is for you.

Margaret Barton:

That's right, and so I sat down. You had the major seat in the house.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, I was a good seat, you know, I liked it right on the aisle and even if it was the center aisle. But they're seeing started with the lady who had just taught one of the improv courses asking for an object to begin the scene with.

Margaret Barton:

Yes.

Mike Roth:

And in their world the scene was 45 minutes to an hour it was.

Margaret Barton:

That was amazing.

Mike Roth:

They did long form. Actually, we've asked them if we can do some short form next year, next July, and she kept rejecting all the offers from people in the audience. And finally I put my hand up and yelled moon rock. And she points a finger at me and says we got it, Moon rock. Yep, and before long I found myself up on stage with the cast.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, actually, you ended up being the lead person in the scene by the end. It was great. It was really very well put together and very funny.

Mike Roth:

And totally improv.

Margaret Barton:

Total improv.

Mike Roth:

Yes.

Margaret Barton:

That was a wonderful event. I'm going to go next year. I think they were great.

Mike Roth:

One of the big things that they taught me was music needs to be added. You know, I've seen, I'm sure you've watched Whose Line is, anyway, with Laura Hall on the keyboard, and it was always good. And I didn't think we had anyone who could do it, and so I asked Wayne Richards, who was with us the first year.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, I remember him.

Mike Roth:

And he's coming back. He came back to one session. He read Laura Hall's book on improv music and he says to me Mike, I don't read music, so don't give me the book. And I said what do you mean, don't read music? You're an accomplished musician, you've written scores and musicals and movies. He says yes, but I do everything by year.

Margaret Barton:

That's amazing. What a talent.

Mike Roth:

Yeah. So I give him the book which, as it turned out, bob Baker wrote, and there's no music in it, it's all words. I mean, maybe there was a half a page of music. So Wayne came to our meeting to get the feel of the group this Monday. He's coming with his keyboard and we're going to begin practicing with musical accompaniment.

Margaret Barton:

That's great.

Mike Roth:

Okay, in the show we'll definitely have at least one number with singing. Our actors are not singers, Our players are regular villagers, but when push comes to shove, there are several who will sing and make up a song on the spot, and Wayne will be accompanying.

Margaret Barton:

We have some good singers in the group. I think we do. That'll be really fun.

Mike Roth:

You think we have good singers.

Margaret Barton:

Not me, but other people.

Mike Roth:

We have a couple. We have a couple I do. John Case is a good singer.

Margaret Barton:

It's great.

Mike Roth:

Kay Branson can sing, Norma can sing.

Margaret Barton:

Doc, if Doc's back.

Mike Roth:

Doc will be in the show.

Margaret Barton:

yes, yeah, he can sing.

Mike Roth:

So it should be very interesting to see what we've done. We practiced it a couple of times without Wayne. We put a scene in where there were three zookeepers at the zoo and they controlled their animals by singing to them.

Margaret Barton:

Oh, that's cute.

Mike Roth:

Oh, it was a riot. Yeah, fall on the floor, so it's going to be very enjoyable. Now we do have some other good news on the improv front that you've probably not heard about today beyond. November seventh show. There is a private show, I think on November 6th, but we just booked a show another private show in the Lake Miona auditorium for a very large club here in the villages, at least 160 people.

Mike Roth:

And then on the 4th of February, the very next day, which is a Sunday, we have another public show that's going to be at Rohan.

Margaret Barton:

Nice, in the big auditorium.

Mike Roth:

The big auditorium.

Margaret Barton:

Great. And that will be different than the November show, because it will be a new skits, new items. Yes, yes, yes.

Mike Roth:

It should be a lot of fun for everybody. You mentioned that one of your favorite scenes is when you do the, the pantomime.

Margaret Barton:

Oh yes.

Mike Roth:

Tell us a little bit about how that works.

Margaret Barton:

Well, what you have had us do is pick one person who is describing either a book or an object or something that they've done, that they believe they're an expert in, and the other person is interviewing them. But the person that's invented something or is talking about what they did, will say things that require someone to show what they're doing. For example, someone was talking about dancing, so I would have to dance. Or somebody was talking about maybe something to do with their leg, and I would have to kick my leg. So whatever they say, then I try to do exactly what they say to match what the people are talking about, and sometimes a questioner comes up with something too. So it's quick and it's fun and it's exhausting really.

Margaret Barton:

I run out of breath by the time it's over.

Mike Roth:

Right. The first time, I think, we put that on stage. Christine Sigel was the expert.

Margaret Barton:

Yes.

Mike Roth:

And she said she had invented a way to train bees how to wash and wax cars.

Margaret Barton:

Yes.

Mike Roth:

And that was an absolutely riotous scene.

Margaret Barton:

She was very creative. She could come up with some wonderful ideas.

Mike Roth:

She was creative and the person who was doing the pantomime came on stage dressed as a bee. Oh, that's nice and it was a wonderful scene.

Margaret Barton:

Yeah, but most of the when I've done them, it's all been improv, it's not. I don't know what they're going to say. I don't know what they're going to expect me to.

Mike Roth:

Well, it's coming from the audience. Yes, coming from the audience.

Margaret Barton:

So I have no idea what I'm going to be Right and the expert has no idea what they're going to be an expert in the questioner is just designed to ask straight-laced questions on a serious subject or whatever it is.

Mike Roth:

you know, training pigs, how to make beds in hotels.

Margaret Barton:

You know, yes, yes and how did you do that? Yes, and it's really a fun scene. I love doing it.

Mike Roth:

Anything else you'd like to tell our listeners before we're out of time?

Margaret Barton:

I love being in this group. I think it's a very enjoyable activity to do here in the villages. It is makes you think, makes you laugh, makes you be creative, makes you work with other people and enhances a lot of skills that you use in daily life.

Mike Roth:

Yeah, you'll make some new friends Right. Absolutely and the group is open. We meet the first four Mondays of the month at Rohan from 6.30 to 8.20, and we discovered that the Pieasano's restaurant is open until 10 pm, thank God, yes, which is about two-minute drive, right, and we go over there afterwards for some camaraderie, right, some food and beverages, which has worked out exceptionally well.

Margaret Barton:

Right, because that is not exactly the hot time to go to dinner in the villages 8.30. No, the place is generally pretty empty, right.

Mike Roth:

But we have a lot of fun as a group and audiences that see the performances have a lot of fun. It's not for everyone. It's only for someone who likes to laugh.

Margaret Barton:

Yes, but we get a lot of repeat customers for the shows.

Mike Roth:

Yes.

Margaret Barton:

So that's a big thing. They want to go to the next one. They're always asking what it's going to be, and what time?

Mike Roth:

where so?

Margaret Barton:

they can schedule around it. So yes, if you want to get show tickets.

Mike Roth:

The easiest way to do it is to go to the club website, thevillagesimprov. com. That's thevillagesimprov. com, and on the first page let's say something about November 7th show and ther e is a button that says click here and that'll take you over to the ticketing page. I hope that there are still a lot of tickets sold, but there should be a few available, more than a few tickets available when the show airs, even though it's pre-recorded. Anything else you want to add?

Margaret Barton:

No, thanks for having me, it's been fun.

Mike Roth:

Thanks for being here.

Margaret Barton:

Thank you.

Mike Roth:

And thanks for being an Improver.

Emily:

Oh, of course, Remember our next episode will be released next Friday at 9 am. Should you want to become a major supporter of the show or have questions, please contact us at mikeatrothvoice. com. This is a shout out for supporters Greg Panjian, tweet Coleman, Dan Kapellan, Ed Williams, Alvin Stenzel and major supporter Dr Craig Curtis at K2 in the Villages. We will be hearing more from Dr Curtis with short Alzheimer's tips each week. If you know someone who should be on the show, contact us at mikeatrothvoice. com. We thank everyone for listening to the show. The content of the show is copyrighted by Rothvoice 2023, all rights reserved.

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